Tennessee Waltz

Other Tutorials:

Cliff Wurst (demonstration)

     The Tennessee Waltz is a four ball multiplex pattern reminiscent of Mills Mess. It contains three distinct cycles, each one containing a Cascade/multiplex throw pair but with different arm positions and direction. I found the obscure Tennessee Waltz on a website run by Todd Strong, which contained no information regarding the pattern's popularity or inventor. However, it does bear a similarity to Cliff's Confusion, so the same individual may have had a hand in creating both patterns.

    To learn the Tennessee Waltz, it is best to begin with the first cycle, and then add in the next two as you go along. Start with two balls in each hand, and then cross your dominant hand underneath your non-dominant hand (you could cross them in the opposite configuration if you wanted, but you will need to reverse the dominant and non-dominant hands whenever an instruction is given). Make a fairly vertical throw from your dominant hand, and then throw a stacked multiplex from your non-dominant hand while simultaneously uncrossing your arms. You will then catch the lower multiplexed ball with your non-dominant hand, and then reach up and grab the top multiplexed ball with your dominant hand as it begins to come back down.
    Practice this until your are comfortable with the two throws. To add in the second cycle, you are going to make a throw from your dominant hand as it reaches up to grab the top multiplexed ball. You will then make an under-the-arm stacked multiplex from your non-dominant hand, clearing space for the ball just thrown from your dominant hand to be caught. You will then catch the bottom multiplexed ball with your non-dominant hand, and then reach over and grab the top multiplexed ball with your dominant hand (just as you did for the previous cycle).
    Again, practice these throws until you can do them consistently. To add in the third and final cycle, you are going to make a throw back across your body from your dominant hand while it is crossed over your non-dominant hand. You will then catch the top multiplexed ball with your empty dominant hand, which should be uncrossing. As the ball just thrown from your dominant hand approaches your non-dominant hand, you will make a stacked multiplex from your non-dominant hand, clearing space for the ball to be caught. You will catch the bottom multiplexed ball with your non-dominant hand, and then cross your dominant hand underneath your non-dominant to catch the top multiplexed ball.
    Practice all three of the cycles extensively. To begin a new set of cycles, you simply need to make an under-the-arm throw from your dominant hand before it catches the top multiplexed ball from the third cycle. This will set you up to make a multiplex from your non-dominant hand identical to the one thrown in the first cycle. The Tennessee Waltz is not a particularly difficult pattern, but it will take some practice to perfect the multiplexes.

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