Tsunami

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     Tsunami is an advanced four ball pattern established by Daniel Marden. It is a shape distortion of the 72416 siteswap, a pattern rarely juggled in its standard form and not relevant to this tutorial. Though bearing some resemblance to Mills Mess, Tsunami is an all together unique trick with no closely related patterns or important prerequisites beyond basic familiarity with four ball juggling.

    To begin learning Tsunami, start with one ball in each hand. Make a fairly high throw from your non-dominant hand toward the center of your body, and then cross your dominant hand under your non-dominant arm and make a significantly higher throw from your dominant hand toward the center of your body. Catch both balls in your non-dominant hand. making sure that there is a reasonable amount of time between the catches.
    As shown, practice this on both sides. To add in the third and fourth balls, start with two balls in each hand. Perform the same two throws learned in step one and then, with one ball in each hand, you are going to make a small throw from your dominant hand toward the center of your body, followed closely by a horizontal pass from your non-dominant hand to your now empty dominant hand. The horizontal pass should be timed such that the very first ball thrown by your non-dominant hand is caught right after the pass is made. Your dominant hand will then catch the ball it just threw, while your non-dominant hand catches the underarm ball thrown from your dominant hand.
    As always, practice this on both sides. You have just completed one full cycle of Tsunami; the next step will focus on connecting two of these cycles together. Start by repeating the same throws performed in the previous step. However, before catching the small throw made by your dominant hand (the throw made just before the horizontal pass), you are going to make a high throw from your dominant hand toward the center of your body. This throw is a mirror image of the very first throw made by your non-dominant hand. You will then catch the small throw with your now empty dominant hand. As the high underarm throw made by your dominant hand descends you are going to perform a mirror image of that underarm throw using your non-dominant hand. You will then catch the previous underarm ball with your non-dominant hand, while the other two balls will be caught by your dominant hand.
    Once again, practice this on both sides. Notice that these two additional throws are the beginning of a new cycle. To continue the pattern simply make a small throw and horizontal pass and then follow that up with more cycles. While not being an especially hard pattern to learn, Tsunami is very difficult to master, with tricky timing and a need for accurate throws.

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